Drop spindles and springs? - Impala Tech
Brakes & Suspension Conversion Questions & more

 
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-09-2012, 08:47 AM Thread Starter
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Il
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Drop spindles and springs?

Ok, I am going to put a disk break kit on my 63 impala. Last night I had a wheel cylinder blow and the single resivour master made it a little sketchy to say the least. So I have seen a few kits that have stock spindles and some that have two in drop spindles. So those of you with drop spindles what do you run for springs? I would like the car to sit low but not hit everything and I don't want a crazy rake to the car either.

I am thinking the two inch drop spindles with a set of 1 drop springs all the way around. What do you guys think / run? A picture would be a big help as well.

Here is my car as it sits

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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-09-2012, 04:22 PM
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It will sit three inches lower in the front but only one inch lower in the back if you do that. Need a three inch drop spring for the rear to even it out.

Big Dave
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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-09-2012, 10:11 PM Thread Starter
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
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I knew that, I am just not sure how it would look with a two inch rake. I don't want it to look silly. I have no idea how low my car is with 60 year old springs either. It may be two inches low as it sits. So 3 inches in the front might only be one inch lower?
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-10-2012, 08:25 AM
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It might surprise you how little ground clearance you have now. To measure it get an eight foot long one by ten and cut it at an angle so that the end is about four inches high and it doesn't get back to the full height of the board for about three feet or so. Then lay a yard stick and transfer one inch marks onto the board. draw a line straight down from each inch mark and measure how thick it is.

Now with your new height gauge slide it under the car to see how much room you have from the various parts of the car (exhaust, tranny oil pan, cross-member, etc). See how much room you would have if you subtracted three inches and look at things in the road like pot holes and speed bumps.

I realize that whites are no longer the majority in America and that Hispanics are now the fastest growing minority. I also know that low rider cars were a fashion statement created by Hispanics back in the late sixties living in southern California (home to all of the car magazines you read). I personally never liked low riders or bouncing air bag cars. It is a fashion style that dose nothing to improve the car's handling or performance in any test I can think of short of a limbo competition. I am not a slave to fashion!

Big Dave
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-10-2012, 01:40 PM
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I have dropped spindles & 1 coil cut all the way around on my 1965. It's got a rake to it, but looks good. I have not driven the car on the road yet, just on my 300 foot driveway.

I do not think it will be too low in the front, but time will tell. One could lower the rear more with air bags if you do not like a rake. They are cheap if you only buy the bag, fab the mounts & put air inthem manually.

Donnie
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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-11-2012, 12:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Dave View Post
It might surprise you how little ground clearance you have now. To measure it get an eight foot long one by ten and cut it at an angle so that the end is about four inches high and it doesn't get back to the full height of the board for about three feet or so. Then lay a yard stick and transfer one inch marks onto the board. draw a line straight down from each inch mark and measure how thick it is.

Now with your new height gauge slide it under the car to see how much room you have from the various parts of the car (exhaust, tranny oil pan, cross-member, etc). See how much room you would have if you subtracted three inches and look at things in the road like pot holes and speed bumps.

I realize that whites are no longer the majority in America and that Hispanics are now the fastest growing minority. I also know that low rider cars were a fashion statement created by Hispanics back in the late sixties living in southern California (home to all of the car magazines you read). I personally never liked low riders or bouncing air bag cars. It is a fashion style that dose nothing to improve the car's handling or performance in any test I can think of short of a limbo competition. I am not a slave to fashion!

Big Dave
That's a pretty strong opinion. I would also venture to guess you've never driven a lowered car.

All my vehicles are lowered, and I can tell you handling is much better when you lower the center of gravity at all, nevermind by 2-3". Maybe it's not something that is a big change in measurement, but by seat-of-the-pants measurement it makes a big difference. And it looks much better.

Oh, and by the way, I'm a white guy too. So much for your stereotypes.

I have an 86 caprice with 2.5 inches ground clearance (still on springs), and used it as my daily driver for a few years around the city. You need to be careful and know where the speed bumps are and how to get around them, but that's just part of the adventure.

my '62 Bel Air is lowered about 3.5" in the front, and it might be a little low for some, but it works great for me. You might want to put in the 2" spindles and see how it sits and go from there. If you don't want much rake, don't put more than a 0.5-1" difference between the front and rear.
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-11-2012, 04:46 PM
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I'm all for lowering the CG. I relocate the motor moving it aft and down for that reason. I also move as much weight as I can to the rear of the car, and lighten what I can not move to obtain a 50/50 weight distribution.

On a Pro Stock car you have about an inch of ground clearance. This is to keep air out from under the car since at the speeds they are driving your car body becomes a wing section which causes your car to take off if any air can get under the car.

TransAm, CanAm, and most USAC all have race cars with extremely low ground clearance for the same reason, but because they drive on a road race track and not in a straight line on pavement that is laser straight and glass smooth, they have to have more ground clearance for suspension articulation (closer to three inches). But then there are neither pot holes nor speed bumps on a road track.

One of the roughest race tracks in this country is about a hundred miles from my house at Serbring, FL air port, and many drivers hate having to come here for that reason. I have driven the race circuit many times as they used to open the track after the race to fans in the good old days. It is as smooth as silk in comparison to many public streets I have driven on. They complain about the transition from the asphalt to the concrete at the edge of the taxi way to the run way.

I have raced in many areas of competition, not just drag racing. I even have friends that consider bumper car racing fun (where you turn left and stand on it whether on asphalt or on dirt). I have not competed in showing cars (many of my cars never get past rattle car primer). I have not found where bigger wheels and less suspension travel actually helps performance. I feel it is a fashion statement driven more by style than function.

If I have offended any one I apologize. I am sorry as that was not my intent. If it makes you feel any better, my strong opinions also personally offended Enzo Ferrari while I was talking to a friend about one of his cars in the pits at Sebring back in the late sixties. He took one of my off hand comments as a personal challenge.

Big Dave
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-12-2012, 03:31 PM
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I have 2" dropped spindles in the front with stock springs and 2" lowering coils in the rear, but I took an extra coil out making the rears about 3" of drop. I have driven it a bunch and it rides great. Honestly, I couldn't see lowering it any more without bags, as going over a speed bump would become an issue if it was lower. Also, I helped the stance by doing 18" wheels up front and 20" in the rear. Here is a pic.

OCD Customs
My Wheels
Classic Nation car pictures.

1965 Impala SS
6.2L LSX with 4L80E, 3.73 Gears, Disc Brakes, Air Ride
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