Custom 66 Impala oil pan? - Impala Tech
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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-20-2020, 05:05 PM Thread Starter
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Custom 66 Impala oil pan?

I was wondering if anyone sells an oil pan that doesn’t hang below the cross member for a 66 impala with a 327. I bought a new one and had it put on but I then realized that when I put hydraulics on my car and try to lay frame it will hit the oil pan. Can I just buy one to avoid this?
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-20-2020, 05:54 PM
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You can have a dry sump pan installed that will solve your hanging below the frame issues. If you try and go without a sump in a wet system you will starve the engine for oil.

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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-20-2020, 06:08 PM Thread Starter
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You can have a dry sump pan installed that will solve your hanging below the frame issues. If you try and go without a sump in a wet system you will starve the engine for oil.

Big Dave
Thanks brotha. I googled but couldn’t find anything. Will I have to do any other modifications besides the oil pump fill tube?
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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-21-2020, 06:48 AM
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Thanks brotha. I googled but couldn’t find anything. Will I have to do any other modifications besides the oil pump fill tube?
Dry sump systems require and external pump usually belt driven off the engine. Also you will need an external tank for holding oil. So you will have to change up your accessory drive system add plumbing and find a place for the external tank. It is a pretty big change in the overall layout, and probably expensive! Dry sump systems are generally used on cars that either see enough G forces from cornering (Nascar) or acceleration (Funny car) that the oil in the pan would whip to one side or the other starving the pump and possibly splashing up onto rotating components. These systems are generally not used to lay frame.

I'm sure someone someplace has a better and less expensive solution to your problem.
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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-21-2020, 11:46 AM
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Problem is the oil must be stored below the crank. The volume of oil is a gallon. As such it has a fix amount of room it will take up. you could spread it out paper thin but the pump couldn't pick-up. So it will need to go deeper, which is what the factory did.

All commercial pans except a dry sump which as the name implies is dry with no oil in it have a wet sump of some kind and all are at least eight inches deep. Most go deeper to add oil capacity (more volume than a gallon to account for high volume pumps). So nothing is going to be commercially available or custom made that will work.

So if he wants to get rid of the sump he need a five stage belt driven pump (two scavenger lines from the sump and one each for the valve covers to suck up all of the oil and air in the engine), a reservoir to store the oil, and an oil air separator, and an additional oil reservoir that is changed with compressed air that feeds oil to the mains on start up. All of this can be plumbed any where under the hood but racers all mount this on the front plate of the motor mount to make engine removal easier and cleaner (the mid plate is actually the rear motor mounting plate). And yes this is very expensive.

Most of the Mexicans who bought old Chevys and turned them into bouncing low riders in SoCal just welded steel rails to protect the stock pans so when they drove along at night you could see the shower of sparks as those steel rails drug along the pavement with the car on the ground.

Big Dave
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-21-2020, 11:55 AM
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You probably have some room to raise the engine with spacers under the frame stands. Check how much hood clearance you have above the air cleaner and then check the clearance everywhere else by unbolting and lifting the motor. maybe gain 1.5"?

You're not after performance so the higher CG shouldn't bother you.

1969 Imapala convertible build thread here:
https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...ghlight=impala
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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-26-2020, 01:06 PM Thread Starter
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I decided I’m just gonna take the car to a custom shop by my house that does metal work and have them section off 1 1/4” to clear the ground. I will have them cut from the bottom instead of the top so I won’t lose so much volume. I will even have them widen the bottom to make up for what will be lost. That was what I planned to do anyway.
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