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  Topic Review (Newest First)
03-01-2019 09:59 AM
justjohn I think the OP has what he needs here. Shears to cut up 18g steel and his replacement pans will be 20g.
I've got both pieces in my garage at the moment and the OE pans do not measure up to 18g but I agree they are somewhat "thick" to be 20g. The aftermarket floors pans are definitely 20g steel.
I've been welding with a Millermatic 220 and it seems to work well just using the 20g auto set.
02-27-2019 08:26 PM
BA. Well I don't understand your point. 20 gauge is thinner than 18 gauge..

An old original factory 20 gauge would weld similar to a poor quality 18 gauge.
I welded low quality 18-gauge metal to higher-quality 18-gauge metal. The low-quality metal will blow out first.
As further comparison I even used 16 gauge to fix the ugly hole in my trans tunnel where some kid hacked it open to move the manual shifter there.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
02-27-2019 07:33 PM
Big Dave Problem with welding Chinese steel arises from the fact that they use recycled steel from scraped cars, refrigerators washing machines and electric motors. All of these sources introduce contaminants into the metal which are caused by inclusion of non-ferrous metals (considered as impurities or alloy elements) like Copper, Tin, Cobalt and Nickel. These metals can not be economically removed from the melt. Things like Silicon from enameled surfaces and other non-metallic elements can be skimmed off the top, or be excluded from the melt at the tap by just throwing away the first couple of hundred pounds of tap slag.

MIG welding is faster and easier than TIG, but TIG will allow you to see the heat penetrating and you can add filler if it "blows through". I learned to weld with an Acetylene torch and a coat hanger (basically the same process as TIG welding, but at a fraction of the cost).

Big Dave
02-27-2019 06:27 PM
BA. Well that doesn't make sense to me.

An old factory 20 gauge would thin be similar 2 a poor quality 18 gauge. And that is not what I experienced. My experience is that supposed equal gauges the cheaper metal will blow through first. Therefore it's most likely the factory was 18 gauge just like my cheap metal patches.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
02-27-2019 10:45 AM
justjohn
Quote:
Originally Posted by BA. View Post
Ya know, as a never-trained newbie welder, it took me several attempts at welding with inferior metal patches before a friend clued me in to how the metal quality between 2 pieces - despite being similar gauge - would affect how you weld 2 pieces together. I couldn't understand why I kept blowing through on the patch.


Sigh. School of Hard Knocks..........
Which is why I said 20 gauge...
02-26-2019 11:20 PM
BA.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deadwolf View Post
I believe the original steel was 18 gauge, but when you are buying reproduction panels that are not original GM panels you can get some variances. Their are only a couple companies that make panels and then for a particular panel you may only have one to choose from. Companies save money or can sell the panels for cheaper costs by going to 20 gauge over 18 gauge and when your dealing with full frame steel cars you will probably never notice the difference.
Ya know, as a never-trained newbie welder, it took me several attempts at welding with inferior metal patches before a friend clued me in to how the metal quality between 2 pieces - despite being similar gauge - would affect how you weld 2 pieces together. I couldn't understand why I kept blowing through on the patch.


Sigh. School of Hard Knocks..........
02-26-2019 12:53 PM
Deadwolf I believe the original steel was 18 gauge, but when you are buying reproduction panels that are not original GM panels you can get some variances. Their are only a couple companies that make panels and then for a particular panel you may only have one to choose from. Companies save money or can sell the panels for cheaper costs by going to 20 gauge over 18 gauge and when your dealing with full frame steel cars you will probably never notice the difference.
02-25-2019 09:58 PM
BA. I believe it's 18 gauge as well, but I don't know it for a fact, just based upon the many patches I put in my Impala.Like a dozen of them. (link in sig)
02-25-2019 12:16 PM
68WASAGOODYEAR Dave, agreed. I definitely want to get something that will cut thicker than what I need, I just didn't have a clue what thickness to use as a baseline. Thanks for the replies.
02-25-2019 11:38 AM
Big Dave I was going to say 18 gauge, but that isn't as important as buying a hand shear (powered hand shear) that can handle a heavier gauge metal as if you are at the limit it will be tiring if not powered to use and will not give as clean a cut (leave a lot of burs that need to be dressed). So your tool should be able to handle 14 gauge steel if you are working with 20 gauge metal.

Big Dave
02-25-2019 11:29 AM
justjohn Should be 20 gauge.
02-24-2019 08:44 PM
68WASAGOODYEAR
Floor pan guage?

Does anyone know what guage the floor pan is on a 68 impala? I'm trying to pick out an air shears so I can replace the pans. Thanks in advance.

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