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This post is incredible. As I have a 65 SS as well and am about 2 weeks away from sending her off to the Paint/Body shop to have this done as well. Except I'm sticking with the 396 after it's been done over with Cam, Heads, Bored Over, Shift Kit, Stall Converter, New Carb, etc...

Loving every bit of this thread.

MB
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Next, attention was turned to the look of the 6.0 V8 engine. The goal was to have it “resemble” a Gen 1 small block, without going over the top trying to camouflage the late-model engine.



The mock-up block was used with the Edelbrock intake and EFI fuel rails. We wanted to move the ignition coils off the valve covers, but wanted to so something a bit different to help the illusion.

The result is this “fake” distributor, made from GM truck ignition coils mounted in a circular arrangement to resemble a distributor cap. The truck coils are the smallest bodied versions of LS coils, and the bracket will hold them in the back of the intake manifold behind the throttle body to resemble a distributor.





A rounded “hat” adds to the look.



This way, traditional spark plug wires will route to the spark plugs much like a old Chevy small block.
 

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I love the fact you are trying to keep the traditional look of a small block chevy, even with a mordern powerplant. I am big fan of the sleeper look!
 

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Next, the attention focused on the side mirrors. These are GM “G” body side mirrors, and a small steel adapter shim plate makes them mount cleanly on the doors, rather than tip inward.





Neat trick with the mirrors. And a welcome upgrade for sure. I suppose you could optionally do power mirrors if the client was inclined.
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
Many have asked, the mirror base is wedge-shaped to pitch the mirror properly.



The Impala originally had large, flat-topped rib starting on the header panel and running up the hood. We are building a custom hood for this car, and the customer didn’t want that flattened rib, so we reshaped the header to come to a peak to match the new hood design.





After some cutting and reshaping, the header now has the pointy peak.

 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
Allright, it was time to address some of the Impala’s wobbly chassis issues. This car had a bit of rust that needed repairing, and we took some time to install some .120” wall tubing to brace up the chassis.


First up was the custom transmission cross member.





The pin-bolt design is strong and also allows for a quick removal if needed.



MagnaFlow exhaust will have to make it’s way around the bottom of the car.



These cars are tricky with the multi-link rear suspension, and we wanted to run full-length exhaust all the way to the back, so everything needed to be built with all the pieces in mind.

 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
Driveshaft loop



These parts will become a removable “kicker” from the transmission crossmember to the frame.






Notching the tube with an HTP tubing notch tool.







The transmission crossmember fully welded



And the whole rig fitted up in the car with the exhaust.



Planning the rear tube exit over the axle.

 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
Why do you need a panhard bar with a factory-style four link that is angled?
The panhard (or track bar, as GM called it) is factory on these cars. Although they have a 4-link rear, it is not a true triangulated 4-link as the Chevelle is. The upper arms are angled a bit, but it is much more of a parallel link than a triangulation. We would not have done much to the bar mount, but the customer wanted the tall aluminum differential cover with adjustable preload, so we had to extend the original mount. The earlier cars had 3 arms and the panhard bar from the factory.
 
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