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Just wanted to post this 1968 Impala with the bonspeed Wheels 20x8.5 and 20X10 Pallisade style. It's lowered with Air Ride suspension.

 

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20's fit that big body right! What air management are you using?
 

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looks amazing I am doing the same with my 1970 i like the rear tucked its nice looking I have 2 types Im looking at cant decide haha

I have always loved 5 spoke classic look rims but i also like the new salt flat rim its sexy too
 

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Magnesium Kidney bean hole wheels are not new. They where the first aftermarket wheels sold. The five spoke aluminum casting was the new kid on the block when they improved the sand casting process for aluminum to get rid of most of the porosity found in sand castings (the secret was painting the inside of the wheel with clear plastic epoxy paint to seal it). Those originally 15" by 5" wheels where designed to mount tall hard tires capable of sustaining speeds of up to 140 mph without exploding. Most post WWII tires back then where 14 inch with smaller 13 inch used on compact cars.

Aluminum is hard to cast for the same reason the king of England gave the king of Germany an all aluminum coat of armor. It wasn't because he wanted the king of Germany wearing Coke cans for armor. It was because aluminum metal was the most expensive metal on the planet at the time. It only existing in places like Jamaica, mon were lightning hitting the Bauxite rich soil created a trace of the lightning left under the ground as a pure piece aluminum of metal. This is because aluminum catches fire and burns in air below the point at which the metal actually melts. So that suit of armor had to made of found fragments of the metal cold hammered flat and riveted together.

It wasn't until a French chemist discovered if you covered the ore with dirt to keep air way from it and heat it with an electric arc furnace that you could make as much pure aluminum as you could want. Of course to pour the molten aluminum into a sand mold to cast it or roll it out in sheets from cast ingots you had to pour it under an argon or helium atmosphere to keep the aluminum from catching fire. Same way you TIG weld it with 100% Argon shielding gas.

Big Dave
 
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