Impalas.net banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am looking to either find my Grandfather's old 1966 Chevrolet Impala or get a '66 frame and build it from scratch. If anybody knows where I can buy a '66 frame from, that would be great! He had a 1966 Impala hardtop in regal red with a 427 engine, 4-speed manual transmission, 3.55 rear axle, front bucket seats, no a/c, and no power steering. He bought it when he was serving in Vietnam through Cars International. They sent GM his specifications and GM made the car and had it shipped to Ford's Chevy Service in Tomball, Texas. He traded it into San Jacinto Motors in Conroe, Texas in 1967. He did not write down the Vin number before he traded it in. If anybody knows of a car similar to the one I have described in this post please get in contact with me asap. Thank y'all!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,089 Posts
Welcome to the Team!

Odds are (statistically) you will never find your grandfather's old car, You can build your own by starting with a 1966 Impala SS Convertible and swaping the six cylinder or small block motor out for a 454. You do not want a 427 with today's gas. The 1961 technology in the head design prevents the motor from making any power with today's gasohol. The engine was designed to run 98 or above octane gas (high static compression) and on today's pump gas won't make the power that a 275 horse 327 will make. To get power ot of a big block on pump gas you have to increase the displacement. So even a 454 is too small and every one builds a 496 (or bigger) instead.

Big Dave
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,089 Posts
Yes. Static compression was 11.25:1 and a modern pump gas 454 out of a pick-up truck has a static compression of 7.8:1. Compression is free horsepower which is what drove the muscle car era (starting with the 1958 Olds Golden Rocket engine that couldn't burn pump gas when it was introduced either; it had to wait two years for the octane to rise to meet the demands of the engine).

A BBC engine was designed to be a race car engine from the get go. It was paid for (in the eyes of the bean counters) as a truck engine where the extra torque could be put to work to move heavy vehicles. It is also why only the Corvette and the Full size Chevy ever received a 427 as a regular production order. The 427 made the Corvette as fast as it's race car contemporaries and the bigger engine moved the heavier full size car (which is why Pontiac had the 421, Olds had the 425 cube Rocket engine Caddy had the 472, and Buick had the 425 Nail Head (the Buick’s small valves were not an accident or an oversight. They actually had a purpose, enabling a tighter, more efficient combustion chamber. Buick engineers were essentially trading volumetric efficiency and high-rpm capability for combustion and mechanical efficiencies—a worthwhile trade in a road car).

It is that volumetric efficiency that kills the BBC on today's pump gas. It is designed to run all day (24 hours straight) at above 7,000 RPM, but with gas that won't burn it looses power on the street where you rarely get above 4,500 RPM.

It costs the same to build a 396-427 as it does to build a 496 and you get more bang for the buck with the larger engine.

Big Dave
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top