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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What’s the best way to adjust my camber? Buy some adjustable upper control arms? Is there another way like an adjustable control arm rod?

I installed some mcnaughy 2” drop spindles and it seems to have really tilted the wheels in at the top. They were already tilted some but it seems more now.
Any suggestions?

thanks!
 

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Without adjustable control arms your alignment shop will be limited to adding a few spacers to adjust camber.

If you want to keep it simple, Global West sells upper control arms with a fixed alignment correction.

If you want it to drive like a modern vehicle try these:
CasterCamberToe-In
Driver-0.5°0.10°
Passenger4.5°-0.5°
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's just not a job you can do & if wrong adversely affects tire wear, you need a wheel alignment.
Yeah I realize that. I just wanted to know if it can be adjusted as I didn't see any way to do it. I need to get it close so I can drive it to the shop.

I did read somewhere that these old impalas do have an eccentric adjusting bolt on the lower control arm. Went and looked an sure enough there is an adjusting bolt down there. That will let me get it close enough to drive safely to the shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Without adjustable control arms your alignment shop will be limited to adding a few spacers to adjust camber.

If you want to keep it simple, Global West sells upper control arms with a fixed alignment correction.

If you want it to drive like a modern vehicle try these:
CasterCamberToe-In
Driver-0.5°0.10°
Passenger4.5°-0.5°
Thanks! I'll take this with me to the shop. I just have to find a decent shop that knows how to work on these older cars.

I did find some adjusting bolts on the lower control arm. It seems to provide quite a bit of adjustment.

I think I read somewhere that on the '67 shims aren't used, not sure if that applies to other Impala years or not. Shims added to mine at the upper control arm would provide the opposite adjustment that I need.

Thanks again!
 

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I think you are talking about the strut reaction rod. That is for adjusting caster angle.

But...I was able to remind myself that you are correct. These years do not use spacers and you need to be very clear about that with the alignment shop. If you get under the car and look at the back side of the lower control arm pivot, you will see a cam for adjusting camber angle. I went back through my build thread but didn't see a good picture of it. It you be obvious now that you know what to look for.

Here's the Corvette version (may actually be the same part): Camber alignment bolts

The most difficult part will be finding an alignment guy that knows how to work with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think you are talking about the strut reaction rod. That is for adjusting caster angle.

But...I was able to remind myself that you are correct. These years do not use spacers and you need to be very clear about that with the alignment shop. If you get under the car and look at the back side of the lower control arm pivot, you will see a cam for adjusting camber angle. I went back through my build thread but didn't see a good picture of it. It you be obvious now that you know what to look for.

Here's the Corvette version (may actually be the same part): Camber alignment bolts

The most difficult part will be finding an alignment guy that knows how to work with it.
Well I was actually referring to the lower control arm cam bolt. That is the one I wasn't aware of until I got under there and looked. That is what I was looking for, an adjustment for the camber. The castor adjustment is done by the strut rod. I'll leave that one up to the alignment shop. I just wanted the camber halfway decent for driving to the shop.

My next issue is that my tie rod ends won't screw in far enough, and my front wheels remain toed in slightly. I do plan to take it to the shop for final alignment, but I'm pretty sure I am out of adjustment so they won't be able to align it properly. Has anyone here tried to use some machined adjusting sleeves to get a little more adjustment? My oem style aren't fully threaded even though there are plenty more threads on the tie rods. I feel like the machined ones from Global West might be fully threaded and allow more adjustment.

And finally, my oil pan is in the way of the steering rod, so I'm not getting a full turn. I may post about this separately. I guess I need to look for an oil pan that has more clearance down there. It is a big block car so
 

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I did read somewhere that these old impalas do have an eccentric adjusting bolt on the lower control arm.
Sorry I should've mentioned but I was in a bit of a rush posting. I should also have mentioned you need to do it on as flat a surface as you can, trying to mimic a wheel alignment machine.

I did research on McGaughys vs CPP drop spindles back in 2011 & went with CPP because I read so many forum threads regarding issues with McGaughys (here's an example of a tri five owned with other users chiming in - Anyone install McGaughys drop spindles? - Chevy Message Forum - Restoration and Repair Help ), but I also discovered that CPP have their own issues too. Firstly you have to get, from memory, 1/8" machined off the drop spindles which added considerable expense to a part I thought was a straight bolt on. And, when fitted the tie rod becomes closer to the ground than the rim (15" rims) which is a legality issue where I am as it would contact the ground first in the even of a puncture & cause steering issues. It also can become a clearance problem mounting even quite low curbs if you approach them at the wrong angle.

I don't think you'll have a problem finding someone that can do the job, they're not that complicated, but the issue I faced was finding someone with a big enough wheel alignment machine for the car, but probably not an issue you'll face in the U.S.

If you look into Global West upper & lower control arms you'll read that they've changed the geometry from factory specs which they say reduces the inherent factory "bump steer". Now i'm certainly no expert but I think there's a very good possibility that by dropping the front 2", without any other complimentary changes, that you may well be making that bump steer a lot worse than factory.

Personally back in 2011 I wanted to refresh & improve the whole suspension as it was 44 years old at that point & I didn't like the look of all that pressed sheet metal & rubber bushes, and our country roads are pretty poor. I preferred the hotchkis square section rear lower trailing arms rather than the Global west's round section trailing arms(1967-1970 Chevrolet B-Body Rear Suspension Package w/ Dual Upper Arms) so I went with Hotchkis on the rear, unfortunately Hotchkis don't offer any front end parts for a 67 so I went with Global West upper & lower front control arms and their front strut rods as well.

The car is very nice to drive & all those suspension squeeks & creeks are long gone. My only complaint is with the Global West powder coating, it's not aging well at all particularly on the front lower control arms & if I had to guess I would say it's a result of poor pre coating preparation of the steel. I'm just not a fan of powder coated anything now, it just seems cheap & nasty, especially when you take into account how long old fashioned paint can last. I guess it's just a sign of how far quality control has fallen now that nothing is made to last anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Sorry I should've mentioned but I was in a bit of a rush posting. I should also have mentioned you need to do it on as flat a surface as you can, trying to mimic a wheel alignment machine.

....
Thanks for all the info. I'll read through the old posts. I've already seen a few little problems with these, but nothing I couldn't handle so far. The worst problem I've noticed is how far it through out the camber, but know I know that I have enough adjsutment with those lower cam bolts. I have only driven it down the driveway and around the yard, as I don't have the brakes finished yet.

Thanks!
 

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Thanks for all the info. I'll read through the old posts. I've already seen a few little problems with these, but nothing I couldn't handle so far. The worst problem I've noticed is how far it through out the camber, but know I know that I have enough adjsutment with those lower cam bolts. I have only driven it down the driveway and around the yard, as I don't have the brakes finished yet.

Thanks!
This why I don’t like aftermarket suspension parts, sorta fit? Milling anything to fit is something I wouldn’t consider. Some ball joints and bushings are ok,
Moog makes an offset upper control arm rod for off setting the upper control arms in, that are original control arms. It will bring camber in at the top, this has been the only real problem over the years.
Tie rods maxed and hitting the oil pan being hit is not a usual 67 issue, aftermarket sorta fit parts are big flags to me. 65-66 were known for bump steer, not 67.
I hope the brakes are not sorta fit 😳
 

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This why I don’t like aftermarket suspension parts
I think you've misread, he needed correction in the opposite direction. I don't think you can apply a broad brush stroke to all aftermarket parts in that way. There are many benefits to replacing 1967 designed & produced production line car parts with modern designed & engineered replacements.
If you haven't previously then read a little about the Global West Products, as a starter this is the Upper Control Arm, the video is quite informative too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This why I don’t like aftermarket suspension parts, sorta fit? Milling anything to fit is something I wouldn’t consider. Some ball joints and bushings are ok,
Moog makes an offset upper control arm rod for off setting the upper control arms in, that are original control arms. It will bring camber in at the top, this has been the only real problem over the years.
Tie rods maxed and hitting the oil pan being hit is not a usual 67 issue, aftermarket sorta fit parts are big flags to me. 65-66 were known for bump steer, not 67.
I hope the brakes are not sorta fit 😳
Right. Oil pan is not an issue normally with a stock oil pan. Mine has a big block with non impala pan and it gets in the way. I got the pioneer oe style replacement so that should fix it. not related to the drop spindles. Which are US made and supposedly good quality. I guess I’ll see.
 
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