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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m adding an original rebuilt moraine booster to my non power brake 63 impala. I’m a little apprehensive about doing it myself but don’t feel like paying someone either.

Is there any advice you guys can give to help me out?

I got the new booster, new master cylinder & new brake line.

Thanks
 

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Power assist used a different rod than the manual. The rod has to be long enough (I buy new adjustable length rods for my change overs). and have the correct end on the rod to fit the master cylinder piston.

Here is one type that is commonly sold (probably because people tend to move towards a power brake and away from the manual brake):

https://www.jegs.com/i/Right-Stuff/965/MCBUL01/10002/-1

Shame I lost my PhotoShop account as I had a pictorial dog and pony show showing the difference in parts.

Beside the hole in the end of the rod being different the piston diameter is different as well as most manual master cylinders for the Chevy were seven eighth's on an inch in bore size while the power master cylinder jumped up to one and one eighth of a inch. Your smaller bore will stop the car, but brake operation is better with the larger bore.

I usually buy a complete conversion unit cut out of a Chevy full size scraped car. This way I get every nut and bolt spring and clip taking the donated part apart on my bench. I also know the year make and model (and VIN if i need it) to buy service parts.

It is because the parts companies can not get and retain good parts counter people that you need a VIN to buy car parts today. Matching a VIN to a part hasn't improved their reliability, or even getting the right part. Just lowered the amount of money they pay the cashier that sells you the part.

Finally mark your old rod position on the brake pedal. Since you are going from manual to power there is probably a second hole above the manual hole which is where the power brake attaches. On power brake cars they don't punch the second manual hole and you have to drill it out if you wanted to loose the power brakes and go back to manual brakes because your cam is too big to work with power brakes (no manifold vacuum to speak of).

Big Dave
 

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And, don't bother putting a single pot master back on it, use a dual reservoir from a 67-up car. I've converted both my 65s to dual masters. On my C10, I lost the brakes when a rear wheel cylinder went. On the Impala, the master failed and leaked out between the booster.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Big Dave the booster was out of a complete running 62 that I believe ended up as a parts car. The booster is complete with the rod coming through the booster where it attaches to the master cylinder (as well as the connector in the rear for the brake pedal) I believe the first one is the one you’re talking about?

Jay, I’ve gone back & forth over going to a dual feed master but I really want to keep the originality of it there. Perhaps I may do it later.

I’ll try to post a pic later if I can, not sure if I still can without photobucket.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are we able to post pictures on here through the website? I don’t have photobucket anymore as many others don’t so I can’t post pictures that way
 

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I'm all for originality. To those who scream second amendment rights I say black powder muzzle loaders for every one: no to cartridges, no to multiple shot clips, no to automatic fire. Just the way it was 200 years ago.

In your case original means never exceeding 45 miles an hour. That was the fastest posted speed limit on a paved road any where in the US back in 1961-'62.

Multiple brake systems were a safety upgrade as the speed limit rose back in the mid sixties after Ike finished his first militärstraße. We as a country have gone on to build many more. But even though we are traveling nearly twice as fast compared to the late fifties and early sixties we go faster than common sense, or the law, or more importantly the equipment we depend upon was designed to go.

Consider a 1965 James bond Film (Thunderball) involving a 1965 Mustang (or as I know it a 1960 Ford Falcon with different sporty sheet metal and a 260 cube SBF instead of a 170 six).

[Bond eyes the speedometer as it passes 60 m.p.h.]

[The speedometer passes 80 mph. The car hurtles down the dark, country road. Bond eyes Fiona’s octopus-logo ring, identifying her as a member of SPECTRE. The car takes a hairpin turn.]

JAMES BOND
Do you fly here often?

FIONA VOLPE
Do I make you nervous?

Now why is James Bond nervous riding around in a 1960 For Falcon? Probably due to lack of brakes and suspension to match the power to weight, though it could be she is going to later try and kill him.

Big Dave
 

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My 1965 is a completely original California black plate car. The later master looks stock to 99.9% of people, not like a really later plastic reservoir one. Yes, I could have replaced my failed single with another single, but for almost the same price, it is really a no brainer to make your car much safer. I even used pre-bent and armored tubing from Inline tube (and their brass distribution block) to really make it look factory.


Do you still run bias ply tires? I don't... I think you see my point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Power assist used a different rod than the manual. The rod has to be long enough (I buy new adjustable length rods for my change overs). and have the correct end on the rod to fit the master cylinder piston.

Here is one type that is commonly sold (probably because people tend to move towards a power brake and away from the manual brake):

https://www.jegs.com/i/Right-Stuff/965/MCBUL01/10002/-1

Shame I lost my PhotoShop account as I had a pictorial dog and pony show showing the difference in parts.

Beside the hole in the end of the rod being different the piston diameter is different as well as most manual master cylinders for the Chevy were seven eighth's on an inch in bore size while the power master cylinder jumped up to one and one eighth of a inch. Your smaller bore will stop the car, but brake operation is better with the larger bore.

I usually buy a complete conversion unit cut out of a Chevy full size scraped car. This way I get every nut and bolt spring and clip taking the donated part apart on my bench. I also know the year make and model (and VIN if i need it) to buy service parts.

It is because the parts companies can not get and retain good parts counter people that you need a VIN to buy car parts today. Matching a VIN to a part hasn't improved their reliability, or even getting the right part. Just lowered the amount of money they pay the cashier that sells you the part.

Finally mark your old rod position on the brake pedal. Since you are going from manual to power there is probably a second hole above the manual hole which is where the power brake attaches. On power brake cars they don't punch the second manual hole and you have to drill it out if you wanted to loose the power brakes and go back to manual brakes because your cam is too big to work with power brakes (no manifold vacuum to speak of).

Big Dave
Dave I’m bout to install this booster. Looking under my dash at the brake pedal the stock, manual brake is hooked up to the top hole. Could it be that the power brake connects to the lower hole?
 

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It has been 22 years now since I closed my shop for medical reasons. I can not remember at this point.

With the drugs I am taking daily and the progression of my terminal disease I wouldn't trust my memory at this point but the info is out there on line.

Big Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It has been 22 years now since I closed my shop for medical reasons. I can not remember at this point.

With the drugs I am taking daily and the progression of my terminal disease I wouldn't trust my memory at this point but the info is out there on line.

Big Dave
Damn,Dave I’m sorry to hear this.
 

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Damn,Dave I’m sorry to hear this.
Consequence of old age. I my case it it isn't so much the age as the chemicals I was exposed to to when I was flying around the world visiting manufacturing plants. Though truth to tell I was also careless in my shop. never owned a blue nytril safety glove. Just stuck my paws into the caustic carb cleaner, as it only burned for a little while. Those poor decisions didn't kill me, just shortened my lifespan. Something for all of us to consider.

Big Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Consequence of old age. I my case it it isn't so much the age as the chemicals I was exposed to to when I was flying around the world visiting manufacturing plants. Though truth to tell I was also careless in my shop. never owned a blue nytril safety glove. Just stuck my paws into the caustic carb cleaner, as it only burned for a little while. Those poor decisions didn't kill me, just shortened my lifespan. Something for all of us to consider.

Big Dave
I do a lot of spray painting(model cars) never really cared or thought to take precautions with myself until a little while back. Big Dave look up dandelion root, vitamin b17 & soursop fruit. Very powerful stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I got some time today & finished putting in the booster/master cylinder. For some reason the pedal still feels stiff when braking. Not as bad as when it had no booster but still somewhat firm.

Is there something I could of missed?
 
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