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My dad has been trying to give me his mother's all original (I thought) 1965 Impala SS 396 for the past 5 or 6 years. I've never taken it because I had no where to keep it. I am now finally building my large workshop/garage and told him I would be able to take it off his hands. During our last talk about it (I live out-of-state, 6 hrs away) I found out that several years ago, he had spun a bearing, ruining a journal. He said it could not be repaired and replaced the block. The way i understand it, this is no longing a numbers-matching car, it has lost some value, but opens up the option of doing some upgrades, such as to an LS-type engine. But my dad is adamant that this bearing is a known problem/weakness and because of this the block can be replaced as long is it is the same size/type of block and does not impact the value or it being an "all original" car.

Any help or advice out there? We are both looking for answers.
thanks,
gbilling
 

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Welcome to the Team Glenn!

Value is in the wallet of the buyer. A numbers matching block can be returned to the car with a set of stamping dies from China that cost under $30 bucks. The numbers we are talking about where hand stamped on the engines identification pad on the assembly line by hand (same way you would do it). The numbers include the date the motor was screwed together, where it was built, and the application code letters that tells you the horsepower and carburetor and what kind of tranny it had. The other set of numbers includes the last six digits of your car's VIN, as well as the assembly plant location.

Most blocks that go to a machine shop for a rebuild get hand stamped again when it leaves as one of the machining operation removes those stamped numbers and letters. There is no way any one can tell a restamp from a factory stamp if you used the correct size die and letter font.

The only other numbers people obsess about are the date codes which should be about ten or less days before the car was built. The only problem with that is you have no way of knowing what day the car was built unless you have the original paper work that came with the car as the car is only stamped with the year, month and the week that it was built (but not the day or the shift). On top of that if there was a UAW or AFL-CIO strike that year (the year that your car was built) then the factory had at least a six months supply of machined castings in inventory to build cars with; so a date code is meaningless because it has no bearing upon the build date of the car.

Now you tell us how important to you is that stamped block number if everything else is original and in good shape?

By the way a BBC has a bullet proof bottom end. If he lost a bearing he was doing something he shouldn't have, as they rarely break that way. They generally die a horrible death due to valve train failure.

Big Dave
 

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IF it is a spun bearing you can fix it if it didn't throw a rod the block should still be good. Source a crank and rebuild it.
 

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Does your dad still have the original block? Even if its gone, The car is still highly sought after as being a original big block car with a replacement engine. Sure it dings the value some but its still a 65 Impala SS.
 

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How the hell do you get a grandmother who owned a 65 Impala SS? All I ever got was a Chrysler Newport!
Unfortunately your father is wrong on this one. Even a period correct block will not make your car be considered “all original”. The main component that many look for is the original block.
Non original Block on an “original type car” --à Deduct 20-25% off Price
Fun factor deduction = Zero
Fix it and drive it. Try to get the original motor.
 
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