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Discussion Starter #1
I'm finally dropping the 454/TH400 into my 61. The question I have now is, when I have the drive shaft shortened, should I go to a one-piece shaft to get rid of the carrier bearing? Also, anyone have a preferred shaft shop in Utah? Also, where should I look for a yoke to fit the 400? (PG coming out.)

Alan
 

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The TH400 uses it's own front yoke that is different from all of the other trannies because the output shaft is bigger in the TH400 than any of the earlier transmissions.

As to the one piece drive shaft that will depend upon your suspension and ride height. If it is basically stock stay with the two piece and look around for a Moog carrier bearing made in the USA instead of the Indian and Chinese parts that are of inferior quality.

Big Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Dave, thanks. Can you also advise on the advantages/disadvantages of two-piece v. 1-piece shaft? What suspension changes, if made in the future, would cause you to recommend the one piece?

Alan
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Oh, while I've got your attention, should I use car 454 motor mounts on the truck tall block (cast in 1971)? (if so, what year should I ask for at the parts house?) Thanks.
 

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Big block Chevy in an Impala (B-body) uses the same frame stands as the small block. There is no difference between them in your year body (there are three different styles of motor mounts) so the year is important as from 1958-'68 took one size. the 1969-'72 models used an interlocking motor mount that is a different size from the older style that was just glued together. And the 1973 up to the LS-x motors (which use a different mount also) used the clamshell fully encapsulated motor mounts. You need to buy a 1958-'68 motor mount to fit your frame stands.

http://www.energysuspension.com/pages/mt_tr1.html

There is no advantage to a longer one piece drive shaft, in fact it is quite the opposite (that is why big trucks often have three or four segments in their drive shafts). Aside from reducing the cost of a carrier bearing there is no benefit at all. The factory uses one piece drive shafts because they are cheaper.

The longer the shaft the bigger the OD of the drive shaft has to be to resist the shaft from coiling up (bending and twisting) under the applied torque. By shortening the shaft you remove harmonics that create vibrations in the drive line. By mounting the carrier bearing in rubber they are absorbed and no noise is transmitted to the body.

Another problem you have is the "X"-frame in your car. It is boxed in the middle where the drive shaft passes through. If you had a one piece shaft and retained full suspension travel it would hit the frame and bend it self into a pretzel before you got the car stopped.

Big Dave
 

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driveshaft

Look up Inland Empire Driveline (google) I had them make a custom made telescoping drive shaft with a aluminum (billet?) carrier bearing for my 62 SS. Very happy, very happy around $600.00 but well worth it. Just my 2 cents.
David
 
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