Impalas.net banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was driving the other day and went off the road when all my dash lights went on, my windshield wipers stopped working, my steering was acting weird and my brakes didn't work right. I called AAA to tow my vehicle and my friend came up. After being there for a little bit, my friend noticed smoke coming out from under the hood. He had me sit in his car, and threw snow on the fire to put it out. It appears the fire was near a Brake Fluid Reservoir. It burnt that area and with the winds burnt some areas to the passenger side. He quickly put the fire out, but the reservoir tank is gone. Is this fixable? I need a car for me and my two children. Has anyone ever heard of this happening?

Also, I had smelled a weird smell and went and got my oil change done and had them put in a new filter. The smell didn't go away and this happened about 2 hours later.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,089 Posts
Not with older cast iron master brake cylinders used on 1958-1970 Chevys we talk about on this board all the time.

Is yours a newer car with a plastic brake reservoir? If so a bad gasket or excess heat can cause a leak which could get brake fluid (a light hydraulic fluid that does burn as well as it peals paint). to drip on your exhaust pipes.

Big Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you

Yes its a 2001. I know nothing about cars. I appreciate the heads up. I am not sure what they are going to do with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Yes its a 2001. I know nothing about cars. I appreciate the heads up. I am not sure what they are going to do with it.
The smell may have been brake fluid dripping on the exhaust from a failed reservoir or o-ring seal.

As Dave pointed out, it is flammable and is most likely the cause of the fire. Replacing the reservoir and master cylinder isn't an especially difficult job, but how much consequential damage the fire did to other systems, especially electrical harnesses, and possibly fuel system plastic lines, will play a major role in cost to repair back to road worthy.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top