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I have a 67 Impala with a 12 bolt. What I can't find anywhere is what the procedure is to remove the lower, or upper, rear control arms safely with the wheels on. Does the rear need lifted off the ground or can the wheels be setting on the ground with the weight on, say up on ramps where I can get under it. I see one rear bushing on a lower control arm that needs replaced so I want to take the lower arm off and replace the bushings. I want to do it safely and I'm not sure what the physics are when I remove the bolt, whether the control arm will just set there or will there be pressure on it that will let it drop hard or something. So my question is, what's the procedure to get the Impala ready to remove the control arm? Thanks.
 

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You just need the car frame on stands and the diff effectively hanging with the wheels off the ground, that takes all the load off of the springs & will allow you to undo the bottom spring retainer before you remove the spring, after that it's all follow your nose, you'll see. Personally I probably would remove the wheels too, it gives you a lot more space to work with.
 

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Yes, take the wheels off and then the shocks otherwise you won't get enough drop to unload the springs.
Don't remove the track bar unless you want to fight realigning your bolt holes left to right.
The forward lower control arm bolt inside the frame can be difficult to keep a wrench on. It's a tight space and doesn't have much clearance for a wrench head. A close end, non-angled wrench should work. I have a shallow 12 pt. socket welded to a piece of bar stock for mine.
If you're doing bushings or new control arms, I'd just work one at a time to avoid muscling the rear axle around.
 

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I don’t believe you can remove the rear end control arms SAFELY without removing the end, yes you could do it one at a time, you have to deal with the springs regardless.
Are you replacing the bushings? Or taking them somewhere to have them pressed in? If you take each control arm a shop 1 at a time it will cost more than taking in 4 arms in with the bushings.
You will need to take the rubber brake line off and chances are it needs replaced anyways, then bleed brakes when done.
I took the complete rear end out leaving the lower control arms in, when I looked back, it would of been a lot easier dropping the lower control arms.
Depends on your skill set and tools, it is one of the easier jobs to do (taking the rear end out) bushings can be a pain depending on corrosion, I did my own bushings but I have a press, you can get creative with a good vice. But document with pics how things come apart, hopefully you have an assembly guide, and or shop manual.
And yes the lower front control arm bolt works best with an offset wrench!
 

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1961 Impala 2 Door Sedan
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I've worked on coil spring rears quite a bit... I follow the method of removing the lower shock bolt and lowering the rear diff to release the springs. The frame and now the rear can be set on stands. I've always worked one control arm at a time to minimize shifting and fighting for realignment.

I created a short chain that I can loop through the spring and the control arm and run a bolt through with fender washers. Just in case there is a little stored energy and it wants to travel the chain keeps it from moving more than a few inches.

Do NOT put your hands on the spring until it is fully released - watched my dad do that and had to pry the spring apart to release his fingers.
 
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