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Discussion Starter #41
OK ...

so this blue one is a "Sport Sedan" ... aka 4Dr Hardtop

and the black one is ... what? simply 4 door sedan?

Thanks.

Perhaps it's because MINE is the latter, but I like it better. Looks faster. :)

Yeah, I'm finding the "factory air" is pretty rare. Of course, in my specific car, the only part of the "factory" which will remain is the registers in the cabin ... all the other will be replaced by the Vintage Air components. :) But ... according to the rep at the Good Guys show in March this year at Texas Motor Speedway ... we'll be CHILL even on a August afternoon in Texas!
 

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The "B" pillar (the post in the middle) makes it a sedan (preceded with the number of doors, such as a four door sedan). Without a "B" pillar it is called a Coupe (in this case Chevy called it a four door sport coupe).

There are a lot of other names that describe car bodies but they are archaic left over from the days of wooden horse drawn carriages such as calling a convertible a cabriolet (there is a slight difference in the windshield that determines the difference). But most call a '32 Ford soft top a roadster when in truth it is actually a cabriolet.

I am ancient; but I wasn't around in '32, despite what many think. My dad who is still alive and well, was born in '22 (but he would have been too young to get married in '32). Seen a lot of changes in car styling in my life time, not all to my liking. I miss Harley Earl.

Big Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #45
Starting to gather smaller items ... new lock set, visor brackets (both are cracked and won’t hold the large visor flat against the headliner), locking gas cap, door jamb dome light switches, and body mounting bushings (aka rubber baby buggy bumpers)

:)
 

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Discussion Starter #47
As I've mentioned previously ... leaning hard for the 383 stroker with electronic fuel injection.

Do I need an in-tank fuel pump? I'm seeing a replacement fuel tank/pump which is clearly different than the OEM tank. with the EFI, couldn't I get the OEM tank and simply add a "lift pump" in the supply line? Since I'm not going to have an injector pump with injectors in each cylinder, I shouldn't need that should I?


Had a '97 Tahoe (350 vortec) with an in-tank pump. What a PAIN when that thing failed. Dead on the roadside!

Thanks
 

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All EFI whether it is port injection or an electronic carburetor (TBI) requires at least 36 psi to operate (most require 47 psi or more fuel pressure to make lots of power.

Your mechanical fuel pump not only doesn't have enough pressure to atomize the gas but it lacks a return line to the tank when the excess fuel that isn't burnt gets recycled.

So yes you will need a new stainless steel or plastic gas tank with an EFI high pressure high volume electric pump (that requires lots of power, so run that big wire to the back to power it).

Or you could run a carburetor that was perfected over 140 years ago. Carb makes more power, tolerates a more aggressive cam (EFI especially TBI will not run with a cam that has a lot of overlap), and it is a fourth the cost of an EFI conversion when you add the new tank, fuel pump return lines and larger diameter supply line to the price of your EFI kit.

Big Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #49
LOL ... so what's your preference, Big Dave!

Perfected? IDK about that. My experience with the Quadra Jet is that it requires a lot of maintenance to keep it properly tuned/running correctly. I'm out on that.

My first thought was a big Holley even when I was looking to keep my 283. Thanks for the info ... so I'll need the return line.

Just curious, though, for a big CFM carb, wouldn't it have the same problem when not "wide open" as the EFI? need to return unused flow? thanks.
 

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I hate horsepower ratings as they are meaningless unless you know at what RPM the HP was measured. If in the case of a 540 BBC that makes over 400 foot pounds of torque just off idle and it climbs slowly to a table top 650 pounds of torque that it holds from 4,200 to 6,400 RPM how is that going to help you? Or I could tell you that it makes peak horsepower of 775 HP at 6,800 RPM. That any better? How often are you running around town at WOT?

It is torque (the twisting force that breaks axles, input shafts, ring gear teeth, etc.) that breaks parts, not peak horsepower. The transmission builders know this as well as I do; but they post horse power numbers that have no bearing on the torque rating of the tranny strictly as a sales gimmick, not as a warranty. Most good tranny rebuilders put their tranny on a reverse engine dyno (big electric motor takes the place of your engine called a Spin-Tron) and they twist it up to see if it stays together at a predetermined torque value. That is how trannies are rated.

GM takes an Alison diesel truck transmission that weights in at 330 pounds and is as big as a SBC and uses that as a 100% value (it is rated at 740 foot pounds of torque) then they assign a number like 40, 60, 65, 70, 80, 85, or 90 to a GM factory built transmission to give you an idea that it is that percentage as strong as the Alison. So a 6L90 has 90% of the torque capacity of the Alison, the 4L80 has 80% of the strength, the 700R4 is actually a 4L60 transmission after 1993 when GM changed the names of all of their transmissions to reflect torque rating.

So theoretically it can live behind a motor that has 444 foot pounds (which I can tell you it won't last long with big tires a posi and hard launches). It can live behind a 444 foot pound of torque motor if you go through it and replace the input shaft, the Sun Shell, the Sparg and the clutches), maybe. Once again depends upon weight of the car and the car's final gear ratio (the immovable object part) compared to the torque curve of the motor (the irresistible force part of the equation).

Big Dave
 

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LOL ... so what's your preference, Big Dave!

Perfected? IDK about that. My experience with the Quadra Jet is that it requires a lot of maintenance to keep it properly tuned/running correctly. I'm out on that.

My first thought was a big Holley even when I was looking to keep my 283. Thanks for the info ... so I'll need the return line.

Just curious, though, for a big CFM carb, wouldn't it have the same problem when not "wide open" as the EFI? need to return unused flow? thanks.
I run an 1150 cfm Holley Dominator on a high rise dual plane manifold and it is fed by an Aeromotive electric fuel pump that puts out 90 psi (great for EFI) at a rated 105 gallons per hour at 70 psi. That is a lot more gas than my motor requires when cruising on the street; but it meets my engine's needs at WOT while racing.

I bought the Areomotive despite how expensive it is along with a Barry Grant four port pressure regulator (one in, two out to carb, one return line) to replace two Holley Black pumps to feed the motor. Despite their advertising they couldn't keep up at WOT. This is because of the small print. Holley tells you their pump flows 140 gallons per hour but only with an open line and no head pressure (level flow from tank to pump out let). It was rated at 14 PSI maximum which is twice the maximum pressure that a carb can use. Both the Black and the Blue pump requires a non-return (deadhead) pressure regulator (not included with the pump).

What Holley doesn't tell you is that when you try and feed a carb as big as mine at WOT that their pump can not keep up. Nor do they tell you that while cruising the fuel recalculates in their pump (rather than be returned to the tank) so that it heats the gas up above the boiling point at which time you are in vapor lock; and all you get at the carb inlet is splashes of fuel at zero psi and a lot of gas fumes.

So much for external (outside of the tank) fuel pumps. As to a carburetor it works, It isn't as sensitive to manifold pressure variations as the EFI TBI is (though if you use a cam that never closes the intake valve you will get reversion which is why a big cam has that big cam sound). You can not have a carb that is too big for an engine dyno. If you are running at WOT such as in a race then bigger is better. If you want to drive it on the street then you will need a smaller carb if you want any throttle response (no surging or hesitation).

EFI has a better start up procedure because the computer gives the car extra fuel and retards the ignition timing to allow the motor to spin over faster for a quick start up. The same computer monitors your air fuel ratio, as the motor warms up (How does it know how warm it is, It has a temperature sensor in the coolant and the air cleaner to measure air temp and coolant temp). These sensors are inexpensive (about $20 to buy as service replacements), but if you break out the kit price for the EFI conversion they are closer to $200. Most kits use the Chrysler computer and sensors for some reason and everyone I have heard about on the four boards I work as a moderator usual trash it and buy an even more expensive Holley or other aftermarket controller to get features not included on the Chrysler system.

A carburetor relies upon a bimetal strip to do everything EFI needs a computer and sensors and programming to accomplish the same thing.

EFI was introduced to meet emission requirements not because a carb wouldn't work but because a computer can be programmed to pass an emission test (think VW was the only one doing that?). The customer was buying the parts along with their new car so the manufacture was happy to be able to pass a test that you should never see.

Big Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #52
Thanks Big Dave.

The shop I've selected for the tranny has specifically built-up his 700r4 ... Phoenix Transmission in Weatherford Texas. Scott just finished a 58/59? they took on a post HS graduation of his son up to Chicago/back. He's convinced me his tranny build will handle any naturally aspirated SBC. He specifically showed me the parts (I couldn't have repeated "Sparg" if you hadn't included it ...) but yes, all of these.

You HAVE made me reconsider the EFI, though. An 800 CFM Holley for the 383??? I don't mind a rail pump ... but I want to avoid the fuel tank pump.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
same post time! :)

don't get me started on the EPA/VW deal. I have an 06 Jetta TDI and had a '12 Jetta TDI. Great little cars. adequate performance, efficient ... and reliable. Anyhow ... that deal with VW made it CLEAR ... someone doesn't want little diesels here in the States.

I want my Impala to GO when it needs to do so, but first is dependability. With a new crate engine and new transmission ... new rear end ... new ... new .new ... I'm holding great expectations of it being an over the road car as well as the occasional ... put the punk with a mustang in his place. ;)

GREAT post ... thanks again.
 

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I may bleed Chevy Orange but I am also an Engineer. I know that the odds of you beating up on a Mustang are slim. Good motor in a body that weighs half of what your car weighs. It is simple physics: F=ma where the F is the horsepower on tap and m is the car's weight. Plug in those two terms and you get your rate of acceleration.

This is the super secret formula that software racing simulators use to tell you how your simulated car will do on the strip.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
Aka power-weight ratio.

As a gravity fighter, I’m intimately familiar. Yes, I know if the Mustang has the same horsepower as my Impala ... I’m not likely to get there first. Hmm ... just searched the 2018 Mustang GT’s specs ... 450hp ... wow. Ok ... well, the point the car needs the ability to move ... now.

Ecklers was running a sale on the fuel tank/kit for fuel injection ... so the cost isn’t as bad as it could have been. Getting EFI on the 383 Stroker ... :). $450 for the entire kit (lines/all) ... OEM tank ~$150, plus hanging hardware, sending unit and line ... that was gonna be $385 ... anyway. Hoping I don’t have an intank pump failure like I did in the Tahoe.

Thanks @Big Dave.
 

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Well you could cut a hole in the floor of your trunk to access it if it went bad. But probably not.

In my car I had to cut a hole in the trunk floor to get the sump of my twin fuel cells to fit. Ran pump gas in one fuel cell and pure alcohol in the second to work with a Nitrous-Oxide hit. That is why I started out with two Holley pumps.

Did you know that if you run NOS with pure Methonal you get Nitromethane? Tends to perk up engine performance: or blow it into itty-bitty pieces if you don't build the short block correctly. Learned that in Chemistry class, as well as how to make high explosives at home.

Big Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #57
Today we finally started the active process of the restoration. As they call it at Armadillo Auto Restoration ... "walking the mile" from the "holding pen" to the tear down bay. Should be ready to paint in a couple of weeks ... they'll bag/tag everything and take photos so they know where everything goes during reassembly. I'd be concerned if they were an Impala-only shop, but they do it all. Have an antique fire truck in progress.

Pretty stoked about today.

 
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