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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm restoring a '63 Impala SS and had to replace the original passenger front floor pan. The repros come with slots in the sides that are there so they flex a little bit and you can be sure it fits all cars. I've got the pan all tack welded in and now I have to fill those slots. They seem too wide for a weld seam and I don't think body seam seal would work the greatest because it is a fairly wide gap. What do people usually use?
 

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I'm having a hard time visualizing this slot your referring to. I tried to google 63 Imp front floor pan but still didn't see anything that looked like what you're referring to. :(
Here's one pic I came across. I don't suppose you have a picture of the issue?

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm having a hard time visualizing this slot your referring to. I tried to google 63 Imp front floor pan but still didn't see anything that looked like what you're referring to. :(
Here's one pic I came across. I don't suppose you have a picture of the issue?

Just above that bare metal piece you can see one of the slots. There are about four or five of them for flex relief when you fit it.
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I see it. Yeah that's a bit wide isn't it. too much for seam sealer for sure. I would have hoped the vendor did a better job in the stamping to get that to fit better.
I'm no welding professional, but when I came upon spots like that on my '66 I would have welded that top-third - just basically bridging the gap using a back and forth motion, starting from the most narrow gap and building to the larger gap until I felt I shouldn't go any farther. Like 3/16" or so,.....then I would cut out a small sliver of scrap metal to mostly fill in the remaining gap and full-weld it in. Like a small patch.
Certainly some hammer and dolly work can help a lot of times to close the gap before welding it. It's hard for me to tell the angle of things in that picture but these are the 2 methods I had to use a few times.
 
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