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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Problem: after running or driving car for 45 mins to an hour, if I shut it off for more than half a minute, it won’t start again. I get red lights only where the hot/cold temp lights are. Don’t know if these lights are oil temp, or engine temp. Have to wait at least 2 hours, or jump to start again.

fan is on blowing hot air.

Lower rad hose is hot, but now I’m starting to think I have installed the thermostat upside down,(unlikely) or I’m having a temp issue in coil or an Issue with the temp sensor on block?

some other things I may note as background information: ive replaced battery and cables, and starter. Had to use a butt connector on S cable for starter and multiple washers to make a solid connection. Voltage is better after doing this.
the “temp sensor” I’m referring to is the two prong connector attached to the top of the block (for cluster).?
 

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1) does it even turn over?
2) is the starter even engaging when you turn the key?
3) do you have a heat shield on the starter?
4) have you checked your starter temp with one of those laser temp-sensing devices?
5) when you replaced cables, batt, etc, did you wirebrush the grounds and replace the grounding screws?

take a pic of the engine bay and post up here
 

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You may need to retard the timing slighly. Put distributor vacuum advance on ported vacuum port. I've had this problem on many of my classic chevies. After trying starters, cables, Starter heat shields, Cleaning connections, The thing that helped the most was a better quality battery with the largest cold cranking amps number I could find. If you are not concerned with originality a mini high geared started may be an option for you.
 

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That was a common problem with the big block in the late 60's and 70's where the starter gets hot. The fix was installing a shield over the starter.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
1) does it even turn over?
2) is the starter even engaging when you turn the key?
3) do you have a heat shield on the starter?
4) have you checked your starter temp with one of those laser temp-sensing devices?
5) when you replaced cables, batt, etc, did you wirebrush the grounds and replace the grounding screws?

take a pic of the engine bay and post up here
1) It turns over, and starts fine if it’s been sitting a while…hours,days, weeks.

2)yes the starter is engaging whe it starts initially, but I get NOTHING when the engine is hot, after letting it rest a while…Not even clicking. And my green light on dash is out. Only red lights “HOT“is lit up.

3)There is no heat shield on the starter.
4) no, haven’t checked the temp of starter. I do have a laser temp gun somewhere…. I was worried it might be hot, or the ignition coil since it’s block mounted

5)All grounds and posts were cleaned, and new hardware was used. I think I’ve eliminated any bad connections at this point. other than maybe the butt connnector and the washers I previously mentioned-on the s post connection at starter. My battery is new and solid, heaviest cranking amps I could get.

photos on the way
Car Hood Motor vehicle Vehicle Automotive design


Ive changed the rad cap, and fuel filter since this photo as well, as they both needed it. I also replaced fuel pump
 

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I agree on the Timing possible, but you mentioned that you replaced the Starter. Was it New? or New-Rebuilt? And was it the correct application for your car? Also, how was it with the old Starter before you changed it? Also what Engine do you have in your '64?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I agree on the Timing possible, but you mentioned that you replaced the Starter. Was it New? or New-Rebuilt? And was it the correct application for your car? Also, how was it with the old Starter before you changed it? Also what Engine do you have in your '64?
I believe this starter was new, not a rebuild- but I could be wrong. It was purchased at a local auto parts store and came sealed in an AC/Delco box I think.

the old one wouldn’t click or turn over. May have been seized up. A few hammer taps of love didn’t help so I opted to replace. but I replaced the battery around the same time, so either one could have been the culprit.

The “Chevy guy” at the local parts depot helped me out, so I hope it’s the right application. It dropped right in on install. Other than the s cable connection, I had no issues.

the engine is a 283 with two speed auto w powerglide.

cheers
 

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I would start with the simple things first and hopefully you still have the box or the paperwork that you got with the starter to verify it to be the correct application. I would then make sure the timing is correct as mentioned above. If you still have the problem, I would try a different battery just to rule that out and lastly, if necessary, try another new starter.

My '56 Nomad with a '65 327 I put in there had a starting issue like that many years ago. Can't remember if I changed the battery or the starter (almost 50 years ago, lol), but I eventually solved the problem. I also put a '67 396 in my '62 and to avoid any starting issues, I picked up a nice heavy duty rebuilt 409 starter. It sure would crank over.
 
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From what you've said it sounds temperature related rather than tuning/timing, compression, spark etc etc, if it were it would still crank over but not start. The clicking that you say you don't hear is the starter solenoid, which must engage to provide power to the starter motor. You can bypass the solenoid by arcing across the posts with a screwdriver. I would get it hot again so it won't start, put it on ramps in neutral with the ignition on & arc across those posts, if it starts it's the solenoid, if it doesn't there's not enough power or the starter motor is faulty.
 

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like @Jynx I think you have a temp related issue. your original post was....

"Problem: after running or driving car for 45 mins to an hour, if I shut it off for more than half a minute, it won’t start again."

to test it, get it hot again where it won't start then check the starter temp with a laser thermometer. then do his suggestion of bypassing the solenoid by arcing. put those two things together, and the first fix I would do is put a heat shield on.

btw, you only have an engine fan, right? not an electric fan?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
like @Jynx I think you have a temp related issue. your original post was....

"Problem: after running or driving car for 45 mins to an hour, if I shut it off for more than half a minute, it won’t start again."

to test it, get it hot again where it won't start then check the starter temp with a laser thermometer. then do his suggestion of bypassing the solenoid by arcing. put those two things together, and the first fix I would do is put a heat shield on.

btw, you only have an engine fan, right? not an electric fan?

ok, I will try this.
okay! Looks like I have a test to run! Thank you both!
Right. No electric fan
 

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I didn't pay enough attention to your Thermostat may being installed wrong. You need to check that first. You also may want to add a Temperature Gauge to your car.
 

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I'll think out load mainly to organize my thoughts.

A few facts. Resistance in the circuit will reduce the current. Heat will increase he resistance.

One simple free test is the next time the car won't crank (i'm purposely not using 'start', I'm addressing what I call 'slow crank'), jump the + cable from the battery to the stater with jumper cable (+ only, at first). See what happens. If it cranks properly, there is too much resistance in the + battery cable/connection. Replace battery cable with 2 gauge (not 6 that's oem). The 2 gauge will provide less resistance than the 6. If no change with + side; repeat test on - side. See what happens. If it cranks properly the -side cable/connection is bad.

If either or both +/ - are bad replace BOTH.

IF the starter's coils do not have sufficient copper in them the resistance within the starter is 'higher' and more susceptible to heat problems. A 'shield' of some sort will help but is really a band-aid. The real problem is the starter is 'low' quality.

Please read the link below:


It explains why the ignition timing has to be correct. And how to set it up.

In general the more advanced the initial timing is the more the residual heat in the engine will cause the starter to provide more torque (via more current) to crank the engine. Get your initial timing correct (somewhere around 10 BTDC should be a nice place to begin). Pay attention to vacuum advance! Full manifold only; 'ported' comes from above the throttle plate in the carb and is basically nil while trying to start. "Full' is taken off below the throttle plate and will provide what you have available.

Just trying to be helpful.

Pete
 
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